Talking Proud Archives --- Military

Medevacs & Medics, Angels of Mercy

By Ed Marek, editor

March 17, 2012

Compassion on the battlefield, “a most meaningful embodiment of emotional maturity”

The American-led war in Iraq has hurt and killed Iraqi innocents. The clips seen on TV were real, they were true. This is a saddening fact that Americans must confront, and not forget. There are few people in the world who have more compassion than Americans and their British allies. We have had no trouble finding more examples than we can show you here that American and British forces have reflected the compassion held dear by their families and friends back home, often at risk to their lives. The columnist Mona Charen says it this way:

"It is no exaggeration to boast that U.S. and British forces are now fighting the most humanitarian war in history."

The news networks show video and photo clips of the injuries that Iraqi citizens have received as a result of the American-led Iraq war. We warn you that the photos below reflect the reality of war and can be graphic. They are not of protestors faking death in the streets of the world. This is real.

InjuredChildBaghdad

Staff of a Baghdad hospital treat a wounded girl that hospital sources say was hurt in a rocket attack by U.S. forces, April 11, 2003. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said it doubted any hospital in Baghdad was still working because of 'anarchy' on the city's streets. Photo credit: Goran Tomasevic, Reuters

The clips have shown badly injured children, deplorable conditions in Baghdad hospitals, injured patients waiting in the hallways, and overwhelmed and undersupplied staff trying to help.

WoundedManBaghdadHospital

A wounded Iraqi receives treatment at al-Kindi hospital in Baghdad where medical equipment is scarce. Note the filthy conditions in which hospital staff must work. Photo credit: Christophe Simon, AFP

The clips are real. They strike a nerve and remind us of the great horror of war, the damage done to the innocents. The American Coalition has fought this war with a very high priority attached to avoiding injuries to the innocents and damage to their life support infrastructure. Nonetheless, innocents have been injured and killed. That is a saddening and tragic fact that Americans must confront and not forget.

It does not lessen our grief for Iraqi innocents harmed by our forces, but we also know that the Iraqi army and its myriad militia have inflicted enormous damage to innocents, most often deliberately, before this war, and during this war. These Baghdad residents shown below, for example, are pushing an injured family member to a hospital after an Iraqi rocket launched at American soldiers shot high and blasted into a house on April 10, 2003.

PersoninCart

Photo credit: John Moore, AP

Charen
There are few people in the world more compassionate than Americans. Of that we are supremely confident. Columnist Mona Charen wrote this:

"Has there ever before in history been an invading force that was more careful of enemy civilians than the enemy itself? The coalition is killing large numbers of Iraqis who choose to die for Saddam, but has made it abundantly clear that we are not at war with the people of Iraq and wish to spare them as far as is humanly possible.

"At its conclusion, which God willing will come soon, we will celebrate the victory of light over darkness. War is a nasty, uncivilized, brutal business. But with that caveat, it is no exaggeration to boast that U.S. and British forces are now fighting the most humanitarian war in history.”

Those lines motivated us to search out examples of American compassion on the battlefield. We had no trouble finding more examples than we could show you here, American compassion, British compassion, even examples of compassion at the risk of coalition soldiers’ lives.

As we assembled this photo gallery presentation, we heard on Fox News that an American soldier was just gunned down by a man in Baghdad who was dressed in civilian clothes while the soldier was trying to protect an Iraqi hospital. Mona Charen’s words certainly ring true. These photos are true, and the actions by our forces and those of our allies make us very, very proud. They reaffirm the enormous emotional maturity of our forces in the field, a maturity we know they drew from their families and communities back home. They also reaffirm the sense of duty, service and sacrifice taught them by our military forces.

As is always our practice, the photos are in no particular order, except that the one that we find most poignant is first.

MedicaIraqi

U.S. Army medics treat an injured Iraqi shot by Iraqi forces firing on American troops in Baghdad Wednesday, April 9, 2003. The soldiers from the A Company 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment took over a section of northern Baghdad under sporadic rocket and small arms fire. Photo credit: John Moore, AP

MedicaIraqiA

U.S. Navy corpsmen, who are the medics attached to the Marines, carry an injured Iraqi man under fire to a place to treat him after the bus he was riding in came under attack by Iraqis as it entered a military compound that U.S. Marines had recently taken in southeast Baghdad on April 8, 2003. Photo credit: Laura Rauch, AP

MedicaIraqiB

U.S. Army medics with the 4th Battalion, 64th Armored Regiment treat an Iraqi army captain who was wounded and taken prisoner of war near Baghdad April 3, 2003. The Iraqi officer was later reported to have died. Pax vobiscum et cum Spirito tuo. Photo credit: John Moore, AP

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U.S. Army medics with the 4th Battalion 64th Armored Regiment treat an Iraqi prisoner of war suffering from gunshot and shelling wounds on the outskirts of Baghdad April 3, 2003. Photo credit: John Moore, AP

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Medics Kyle Norris of San Clemente, CA, center, and Rashon Kyle of Oceanside, CA, right, of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit's, Echo company, treat an Iraqi boy in the city of An Nasiriyah, southern Iraq on April. 3, 2003 who suffered from burns 2 months ago. Photo credit: Itsuo Inouye, AP

MedicaIraqiE

A wounded and handcuffed Iraqi soldier is treated by U.S. Navy medics of the 3/4 Battalion Aid Station before evacuation to a military hospital near Diwaniyah in south central Iraq April 1, 2003. Photo credit: Laurent Rebours, AP

MedicaIraqiF

A wounded Iraqi soldier gets water from a U.S. Navy medic of the 3/4 Battalion Aid Station near Diwaniyah in south central Iraq April 1, 2003. The number 3 on his hand means the number of wounded the medics have to treat. Photo credit: Laurent Rebours, AP

MedicaIraqiG

U.S. Army medics evacuate an injured woman who was caught in the crossfire between American and Iraqi forces over the Euphrates River when the Army seized a bridge in Hindiyah, Iraq March 31, 2003. The Army's Task Force 4-64, part of the 3rd Infantry Division, took the strategic bridge in its move north towards Baghdad. The woman, who was near a dead civilian man, was bleeding and apparently shot in the buttocks. These troops removing her are under fire. Photo credit: John Moore, AP

MedicaIraqiH

An Army medic from Task Force 2-69 Armor, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Benning Georgia, tries to help an Iraqi civilian who was struck in the head by shrapnel from an aerial bombing in Baghdad, April 9, 2003. The man seemed to be doing fine after getting his head bandaged, but suddenly collapsed. Photo credit: David Leeson, Dallas Morning News, Reuters

MedicaIraqiI

Cmdr. Linda Nash, U.S. Nurse Corps, evaluates an Iraqi patient in the casualty receiving area aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort in the Gulf on April 10, 2003. Comfort is deployed conducting missions in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Doctors on the Comfort have treated nearly 300 wounded or sick Western troops and Iraqi prisoners and civilians since the war began. Photo credit: Erica Mater, US Navy

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U.S. Marine Medic HM3 Ramirez, from El Paso, Texas, treats an elderly Iraqi man with respiratory problems, in a school in the city of Nassiriya in southern Iraq April 7, 2003. Photo credit: Desmond Boylan, Reuters

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A British army medic applies pressure in order to stop bleeding in the leg of Iraqi Waleed Jaawil, on the outskirts of Basra, April 6, 2003. Jaawil said he was shot by militia who told them to go back to the city to 'fight the war.' There have been persistent reports of Baathists intimidating Basra residents during the U.S.-led war on Iraq. Photo credit: Yannis Behrakis, Reuters

MedicaIraqiL

Navy medic HM3 Thomas Riggs of Boise, Idaho, with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Fox Company 'Raiders' treats an Iraqi girl for a breathing infection in the town of Nassiriya in central Iraq April 3, 2003. Photo credit: Desmond Boylan, Reuters

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Navy medic HM3 Michael Smith of Saint Louis Missouri (R) with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Fox Company 'Raiders' treats an Iraqi baby for a breathing infection in the town of Nassiriya in central Iraq April 3, 2003. Photo credit: Desmond Boylan, Reuters

MedicaIraqiN

Navy medic HM3 Thomas Riggs of Boise, Idaho, (bottom R) and HM3 Quay Struckmeyer (top R) from Texas, with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Fox Company 'Raiders' treat Iraqi people in the town of Nassiriya in central Iraq on April 3, 2003. Photo credit: Desmond Boylan, Reuters

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Navy medic HM3 Cody Johnston of Fort Smith, Arkansas, with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Fox Company 'Raiders' treats an Iraqi boy for a breathing infection in the town of Nassiriya in central Iraq April 3, 2003. Photo credit: Desmond Boylan, Reuters

MedicaIraqiP

British Military Medics serving with 1st Close Support Medical Regiment attached to the Scottish Dragoon Guards, (Tanks), give medical aid to an Iraqi man aided in his escape by a friend from the city of Basra in southern Iraq March 30, 2003. Photo credit: Giles Penfound, Crown, Reuters

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Colonel Dunken Robertson (L) of British 4 General Support Regiment Medics provides medical attention to an Iraqi child as British troops of 187 Squadron, 23 Pioneer Regiment, hand out food and fresh water to the local population in a village south of Basra in southern Iraq March 27, 2003. Photo credit: Corporal Paul (Jabba) Jarvis, Reuters
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